The best shoes for running, lifestyle, street style and durability

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Sustainable

AllBirds: Tree Dashers
Counting actresses Eva Longoria and Kate Hudson as fans, the logo-less design is crafted with natural materials including eucalyptus, candy cane and merino wool, and a flexible seamless upper to enhance breathability. One of the lowest carbon footwear on the market, if that’s important to you. Multiple colors for men and women, $ 225, allbirds.com.

Veja: Campo
This environmentally conscious French brand is a favorite of celebrities such as Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Reese Witherspoon. Ethically produced in Brazil, the entire range includes Fairtrade organic cotton, Amazonian rubber, recycled plastics and vegetable tanned leathers. The low-profile Campo might not be the best exercise shoe, but don’t worry: the brand recently released its first runner, the Marlin. $ 200 to $ 210 for Campo, theiconic.com.au.

Nike: Blazer Mid ’77
The latest in Nike’s evolution towards more sustainable materials, this classic basketball silhouette is made from 20% recycled content by weight and uses natural vegetable dyes and cork. Available with a Pink or Blue Swoosh, it features a nature-inspired embroidered design, $ 150- $ 160, nike.com.

Clockwise from top left: Frankie4 JACKiE III; Calao Lakkari bare shoes; and Nike React Infinity Run 2.

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Support and functional

Frankie4: JACKiE III
This Brisbane-based brand was created by a podiatrist-physiotherapist but don’t think of “orthopedic” shoes. The minimalist all-leather JACKiE III is available in multiple colors and includes a heel counter and cradle, arch support and a cushion support system on the sole. $ 239.95, frankie4.com.

Bare shoes: Calao Lakkari
Founded by a Melbourne podiatrist 11 years ago, Bared Footwear sneakers feature a biomechanical sole that cushions and reduces pressure on the heel. In its latest collection, the brand collaborated with artist Gamilaroi Ularoi / Yuwaalaraay Lakkari Pitt, whose Gunagala pastel artwork is featured on the sneaker. For men, the Lead style will bring sport-luxury to your street style. The two $ 239 ($ 50 of the Lakkari Pitt styles will go to the Children’s Ground Indigenous education charity), bared.com.au.

Nike: React Infinity Run 2
As one of the brand’s most padded designs, this sneaker is said to incorporate injury prevention technology, with everyday runners in mind (especially those who beat the pavement). The updated Flyknit upper and durable rocker-shaped foam bottom promote stability and protection. $ 230, nike.com.

Clockwise from top left: Reebok: Victoria Beckham x Reebok Zig Kinetica;  New balance 237;  Adidas Forum Low Shoes;  and Puma Wild Rider Layers sneakers.

Clockwise from top left: Reebok: Victoria Beckham x Reebok Zig Kinetica; New balance 237; Adidas Forum Low Shoes; and Puma Wild Rider Layers sneakers.

Street style

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Adidas: Low shoes Forum
Made famous by American basketball players including Michael Jordan (before signing with Nike), these ’80s basics have been re-released with varsity-style silhouettes and bold colourways. Our favorite is navy / red / yellow but you can’t go wrong with classic white. $ 150, adidas.com.au.

Reebok: Victoria Beckham x Reebok Zig Kinetica
This is the fifth capsule of Spice Girl who became designer Victoria Beckham with the American sports giant. The Zig Kinetica features a padded interior and absorption technology designed to keep feet comfortable, and is available in trendy colors, including a gray / mint combo. Certainly a shoe versatile enough to go from sport to chic. Available July 22, $ 350, reebok.com.au.

New Balance: 237
Reminiscent of the “daddy sneaker,” but with a more tailored fit, the 237 pays homage to the colors of the 70s and the suede, leather and mesh construction of New Balance. Ideal for anyone who loves color in their athletic shoes, at a great price. $ 130, newbalance.com.au.

Puma: Wild Rider Layers Trainers
With the endorsement of Brazilian footballer Neymar Jr, this lifestyle sneaker is inspired by the Rider OG and the ’90s track stud. Mix of leather and suede on a nylon upper, this is for people who like to mix and match. playful tones and raw textures. $ 170, au.puma.com.

Clockwise from top left: Superga 2869 Club S Flower Bloom Embroidery;  Mimco Est.  96 sneakers;  Taeger cup sole;  Adidas Stan Smith Durable.

Clockwise from top left: Superga 2869 Club S Flower Bloom Embroidery; Mimco Est. 96 sneakers; Taeger cup sole; Adidas Stan Smith Durable.

Cool box

Taeger: Cupsole – White
As Australia’s response to Insta’s favorite joint projects, Taeger promises durability and superior quality at a fraction of the cost. Its handmade Cupsole sneaker, made in Portugal, features a 100% vegetable-tanned nappa leather upper. The perforated logo adds to its office-to-dinner credibility. $ 199, wearetaeger.com.

Superga: 2869 Club S Flower Bloom Embroidery
Talk about a spring in your step, literally. This classic style from the Italian label adored by the Duchess of Cambridge and Hailey Bieber is the perfect work sneaker and pairs perfectly with a pleated skirt. Just add a t-shirt and a blazer. $ 179.95, superga.com.au. For another unisex option, try the 2750 Cotu Classic.

Adidas: enduring Stan Smith
These are the timeless tennis sneakers worn by countless celebrities that really don’t need to be introduced. New is a redesigned logo that better aligns with Adidas’ increased commitment to sustainability. The outsole is made from waste rubber and 50% of the upper is made from PRIMEGREEN recycled content. $ 140, platypus.com.au.

Mimco: Est. 96 sneakers
Released as part of the Australian accessories brand’s 25th anniversary capsule collection, these canvas high top shoes are straight out of the ’90s. Designed for comfort, the cotton-knit lining is made from recycled yarns and comes with two sets of laces. $ 179, mimco.com.au.

Clockwise from top left: Tom Ford Cambridge;  Tod's No_Code;  Reebok x Maison Margiela;  and mesh and rubber sneakers with Balenciaga Track logo.

Clockwise from top left: Tom Ford Cambridge; Tod’s No_Code; Reebok x Maison Margiela; and mesh and rubber sneakers with Balenciaga Track logo.

Do crazy things

Reebok: Maison Margiela Classic Leather Tabi High Shoes
If you want to spend a little extra cash, Maison Margiela Creative Director John Galliano helped the American sportswear brand reinterpret its 1985 classic. Reminiscent of a gladiator sandal, the high leather upper showcases the design. Margiela’s signature split-toe tabi. $ 800, reebok.com.au.

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Tom Ford: Cambridge leather-trimmed suede sneakers
From office outfits to casual dining, these versatile sneakers are an investment for men who like their wardrobe pieces to go the extra mile. Crafted in Italy from burgundy suede and leather, the minimalist silhouette pairs perfectly with a relaxed suit and jeans. $ 1,054, mrporter.com.

Tod’s: No_Code sneakers
Luxury fashion meets high performance through these stylish and timeless sneakers. The versatile streetwear shoe features a lightweight EVA outsole with plenty of supportive cushioning and the heritage design Tod’s is known for. $ 1,030, tods.com.

Balenciaga: Track logo mesh and rubber sneakers
Fans of the ugly shoe, rejoice! The Spanish luxury fashion house has created a chic iteration of the trend that has spawned countless knockoffs. Set on the brand’s signature chunky soles, the shoe is a favorite with influencers and casual models such as Bella Hadid. Perfect for adding a beefy side to a feminine dress or for peeking at the bottom of a plush coat. $ 1,490, net-a-porter.com.

A podiatrist’s guide to finding the right shoe

Tips from Joe Brooks, director of the Australian Podiatry Association:

  • For the fit, measure not only the length but the width between toe and back, different depths and upper material. Do not stand still when trying on a shoe; Brooks recommends walking or jogging down the street (or on a store treadmill) to gauge your body’s reaction.
  • Consider the purpose and frequency of wear. “An elliptical trainer is the best option for a change of direction sport, but for getting to or around work, a walking or lifestyle shoe may be better. “
  • For people with health problems or injuries, Brooks recommends seeking advice from a licensed podiatrist.

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